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Neesima’s Residence

Highlight
The 1918 reed organ that Yae cherished and the study that students used freely

The home lived in by the founders of Doshisha University

This is the house that the Doshisha University founders, Jo and Yae Neesima, lived in. It is said that in efforts to build a house-cum-church, Jo Neesima received design advice about architectural style from a foreigner teaching at Doshisha, with the actual building work being done by a local Kyoto carpenter.
Built in 1875, the two-story, timber-framed house has a colonial façade, with balconies running around three sides, louver shutters on the glass windows and paper sliding doors on the upper parts. Whereas, the interior retains Japanese elements, such as grid box layout and makabe-zukuri walls with the posts protruding from the surfaces of the walls. The 1st floor contains the kitchen, dining room, drawing room and study, with a tea room being added by Yae after Jo died. Notably, the drawing room served many purposes: as a classroom, staff room, fundraising office and even as a place for worshipping. And, the study stands as it was when used, with furnishings beloved by Jo still in the places as when he used them.
Furnishings and household appliances designated as tangible cultural assets by Kyoto City.

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Question

What was often laid out on the Neesima dining table?

Address Matsukage-cho Teramachi-dori Marutamachi-agaru, Kamigyo-ku
TEL 075-251-2716(Doshisha Gallery in Harris Science Hall)
FAX 075-251-2736
URL https://archives.doshisha.ac.jp/old_mansion/old_mansion.html
Hours 10:00-16:00 (entry by 15:30), ①Generally open every Tue, Thu, Sat (except Nat Hols) between Mar-Jul & Sept-Nov, ②Special open periods (limited periods) ※See homepage for details
Closed Aug, Dec-Feb, Mon, Wed, Fri, Sun, Nat hols during generally open period
Adm Free
Access A 13-min walk from the Subway Karasuma Line Marutamachi Stn/ A 10-min walk from Keihan Jingu-Marutamachi Stn/A 5-min walk from Kawaramachi-Marutamachi Stop of City Bus

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